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  • Multiphonics and Extended Techniques for Wind Instruments

    The Woodwind books written for the composers:

    "The Techniques of Oboe Playing"
    by Peter Veale and Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf
    Baerenreiter, Kassel, Germany, 1994
    Text is in English, German, and French.
    http://www.amazon.com/Techniques-oboe-playing-Spieltechnik-Englischhorn/dp/3761812108

    - This book contains a compact disk with 390 multiphonics, timbre fingerings, eight-tone scale, double harmonic, eight note trills, effect without reed, air tone. key noise, slap tongue, double harmonic. It is the only compendium of new techniques of Oboe playing, also contains examples of the Cor Anglais.

    "New Sounds For Woodwind"
    Bartolozzi, Bruno
    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967

    "Nouvelles Techniques de la Clarinette Basse – New Techniques for the Bass Clarinet"
    Henri Bok, Eugen Wendel
    With optional cassette available
    Salabert Editions, Paris, 1989
    - Or on Henri’s website: the new intermediate edition, incl. a Compact Disk with multiphonic glissando, extreme high register, harmonics, frullato, aeolian sounds, kissing effect, playing on the neck, mouthpiece alone, vox humane, shakes, tremoloes, glissando, key percussion
    http://www.henribok.com/

    "Saxophone Multiphonics"
    by Ken Dorn
    At the moment, this is the standard book for Saxophone
    http://www.dornpub.com/multiphonics.html

    "The Other Flute"
    A Performance Manual of Contemporary Techniques
    Rober Dick
    Multiple Breath Music Company; 2nd Sprl edition (1989)
    English, ISBN-10: 0939407027
    http://www.robertdick.net/

    "La Flûte"
    Pierre-Yves Artaud
    Editions Jean-Claude Lattes, 1986,
    Translated in German, Spanish and Japanese

    German edition: "Die Flöte"
    Pierre-Yves Artaud
    Zimmermann Musikverlag (1991), Deutsch
    http://www.amazon.de/Die-Fl%C3%B6te-Pierre-Yves-Artaud/dp/3921729440


    Brass Multiphonics
    Brass instruments cannot produce two tones simultaneously, singing and playing constitutes their only possibility for multiphonics.


    Some online resources:

    Multiphonics Online, with downloadable sounds:
    Heckel-System (German) Bassoon Multiphonic Fingerings:
    http://idrs.colorado.edu/bsnfing/fingmult.htm

    Multiphonics for the Oboe
    http://idrs.colorado.edu/www.idrs/publications2/journal2/jnl10/multi.html

    Some acoustical principles of clarinet multiple sounds
    http://www.research.umbc.edu/~emrich/chapter3.html

    Altissimo Multiphonics à la David Sanborn
    http://www.saxophone.org/multi.html


    A contemporary composer and some musicians:

    Nguyen-Thien Dao , composer
    http://www.nguyenthiendao.com/index2.html

    Peter Veale, oboist
    http://www.imd.darmstadt.de/imd-ferien/vea.htm#english

    Matthias Ziegler, flutist
    http://www.matthias-ziegler.ch/english/ensembles/index.html

    Sandro Friedrich-Northrop, flutist, with sound examples
    http://www.powerflute.ch/index.html

    .

    Okay?

    .

  • That is an impressive list. Wow. You are a truly demented scholar, Angelo, I must say. Has anybody ever noticed Harry Partch? He was doing things similar some time ago, inventing weirdass instruments, abusing normal ones, etc. Some very interesting sounds there.

    though we live in a time of information, art and technology glut. You can do so much, that you almost have to decide to limit yourself to one set of possibilities instead of constantly being detoured by more and more enticing variations.

    Though I like to hear an oboe player sucking instead of blowing on his reed just as much as the next fellow.

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    @Another User said:

    ... Though I like to hear an oboe player sucking instead of blowing on his reed just as much as the next fellow.

    I forwarded that comment to the oboist model agency!

    .

  • Angelo

    ... definitely meant as a compliment!

  • That's really amazing, thank you so much. Concerning the flute, I can confirm the recommendations, since exactly these books were given to me from a flute player.

    I once heard Robert Dick playing. At that time I wasn't particularly interested in solo flute music, but still he really impressed me. Very recommended.

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    @mathis said:

    That's really amazing, thank you so much. Concerning the flute, I can confirm the recommendations, since exactly these books were given to me from a flute player.


    There are not that many books available on the subject "Nouvelle Techniques" on woodwind instruments. Also the online resources are not that wide. Certainly the ones I listed, are very good ones, and I can recommended them because I have them too. Back when I brought this books, there was still a dedicated music store in town who had such specialized books in stock and available for preview.

    Btw, an email just came in from Henri Bok, author of "New Techniques for the Bass Clarinet", saying that all notated examples are on the compact disk, and that are a lot of examples, i.e. 112 multiphonics for bass clarinet etc..

    ______________________________________

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Henri Bok
    To: Angelo Clematide
    Sent: Sunday, January 14, 2007 6:30 PM
    Subject: Re: Question to Henri

    Angelo,

    This edition is in English only and is updated.
    It also contains a new repertoire list, a few pieces and several articles.

    The cd which comes standard with the book has all the examples and effects plus some extras.

    Ciao, Henri BOK

    .

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    @Angelo Clematide said:

    There are not that many books available on the subject "Nouvelle Techniques" on woodwind instruments.


    Yes, and that's why I was confirming the Dick, since this flute player told me that a lot of people use another book (I forgot which one) which is simply wrong in a lot of cases. Use the Dick and you're fine.

  • I did that last night and was fine.

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    @William said:

    I did that last night and was fine.

    [[:|]] [:D]

    DG

  • ooh! Just saw this -- thanks, Angelo! Absolutely brilliant!

    J.

  • Just wondering, to any official VSL staff out there: are there any plans for extended technique samples in the future? I realize there are a huge number of possibilities, but certainly a core set of "FX" could be determined and recorded for a new library.

    J.

  • Angelo

    yeah, I have an old but very good quality LP of Harry Partch that has a lot of pictures, and recordings, of all these strange instruments, as well as modifications of normal ones. The music itself is extremely original and fascinating. he was quite an innovator I agree.

  • Ohh, very nice. I don't have any Harry Partch recordings. I remember some picture of him with instruments he constructed himself, i.e. this one:

    http://www.harrypartch.com/boophoto.htm

    ... and I remember visiting Ivor Darreg in Glendale, I was very young then, you should have seen me when Ivor played me a blues on a 19-note per octave fretted guitar. And of course still have all the issues of "Interval - A Microtonal Newletter" from Jonathan Glasier:

    http://sonic-arts.org/darreg/photos/ivor.htm

    http://sonic-arts.org/index.html

    http://sonic-arts.org/glasier/homepage.html

    http://tonalsoft.com/interval/interval.aspx

    .

  • I will try and dig out that record and get some of those pictures. Though I am afraid it is lost in my stacks now, and that is not a good situation...

  • Here some examples of microtonal music, it is not as strange as some might think...

    This guitar has 19 tones/frets in each octave:
    http://eceserv0.ece.wisc.edu/~sethares/mp3s/Truth_on_a_Bus.mp3
    http://eceserv0.ece.wisc.edu/~sethares/mp3s/SympatheticMetaphor.mp3

    Paganini's Caprice No.24 à la Classical Music of Thailand:
    http://eceserv0.ece.wisc.edu/~sethares/mp3s/PagansRevenge.mp3

    .

  • I strongly recommend watching one video on Robert Dick's website.
    Goto www.robertdick.net, choose Videos, select the second one "Thinking creatively".
    It is a documentation from a lecture he gives to corporate people, it shows off quite something of his playing attitude. Imagine a whole orchestra working like that...

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    @mathis said:

    ... playing attitude. Imagine a whole orchestra working like that...


    If it ever gets that far, then I may permit an orchestra to play my partiture, but till then the conditions as written on page 2 of my partiture are binding.

    .

  • That is very interesting to think of a whole orchestra playing like that!

  • Hit The Line

    Here microtones realized as motion graphics:

    http://www.coverpop.com/whitney/index.php?var=v6

    plus 19 other variations:

    http://www.coverpop.com/whitney/index.php?var=v0

    .

  • PaulP Paul moved this topic from Orchestration & Composition on