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  • Uneven Velocity

    Could anyone point me in the right direction on the problems I am having, where certain notes are much louder or softer than expected? Thanks in advance!

    I'm getting uneven velocitry response. In other words, the sound I hear varies quite a bit from the velocities I've played/entered. I can appreciate why this might vary from one patch to another (my matrixes tend to contain 6-8 patches on average). But I'm running into this within one patch. For example, the Violins "performance interval sustain 4 velocity level" patch jumps all over the place. There is a huge jump from velocity value=108 to velocity value = 109. What I find particularly interesting is that the perceived volume varies greatly depending on whether there is a note preceding the note in question.

    I'm new to VSL (Orchestral Strings I and II of Symphonic Cube, levels 1 and 2), running in Logic Pro 7.2.3 on Mac G5 dual 2.7 power PC

    Large Vienna Library all on SSD, Protools/Carbon on M1 MacBook Pro, OSX Monterey 12.7, Steinway D, Rhodes Mk8-FX, Osmose, Moog One, Trigon 6-DT, OB-X8, Prophet 10 rev4, OB-6-DT, Kawai VPC-1
  • The Cube works better if done a little differently from the way we're used to other VIs working. Usually, we nail the velocity input right off the top as we enter the notes.

    Make sure your X-Fade is active-- this will allow you to enter all your notes at pretty much the same velocity. Then go back and program in your cc# expression, volume, etc. The diversity of available velocity layers are not always compatible with playing styles. Using the X-Fade and expression controls after notes are entered provides smooth transitions between note volumes. It also forces you to think in large musical arcs as you enter control data across phrases rather than worrying about the velocities from one note to the next.

    With the Cube, I don't even bother with MIDI velocity any more. I sort of miss it, but then when I hear better results without it I can't really complain.

  • Thank you, JWL. I see what you mean, this makes a huge difference.

    "Velocity Xfade" does more than I expected from its name. It seems to not only select the initial sample and velocity/volume settings for each note based on the value of the assigned controller, but also seems to then vary the continuing volume of that sample as the controller value varies. Very cool. and I can see how it will allow a much more realistic outcome. I wonder if it does something else, too. I've sensed in the performance interval patches that the note value and velocity of the prior note seems to have an effect on the attack and volume of the next note. This process seems to produce smoother, more natural results when I use the velocity xfade.

    Nevertheless, I'm still running into unevenness even using Velocity Xfade. (Examples described below.) It would help to know if what I'm describing is "the way it is" or not - so I can determine whether I need to reinstall or trouble-shoot other variables.

    Examples:

    I encountered these on my latest project, recording MIDI performances into Logic and then editing, working in orchestral violins performance interval sustained patch (4 levels velocity):

    1. there is a huge jump if velocity (or velocity xfade) goes from 108 to 109. If a string line passes through this point it is very difficult to get an even sound.

    2. There seems to be more uneveness through the highest 8 or so notes. Also, I have one string line that hits a G6 early in the line, and then returns to it later, and the second G6 is half as loud as the first G6 - consistently.

    Large Vienna Library all on SSD, Protools/Carbon on M1 MacBook Pro, OSX Monterey 12.7, Steinway D, Rhodes Mk8-FX, Osmose, Moog One, Trigon 6-DT, OB-X8, Prophet 10 rev4, OB-6-DT, Kawai VPC-1
  • last edited
    last edited

    @JWL said:

    The Cube works better if done a little differently from the way we're used to other VIs working. Usually, we nail the velocity input right off the top as we enter the notes.

    Make sure your X-Fade is active-- this will allow you to enter all your notes at pretty much the same velocity. Then go back and program in your cc# expression, volume, etc. The diversity of available velocity layers are not always compatible with playing styles. Using the X-Fade and expression controls after notes are entered provides smooth transitions between note volumes. It also forces you to think in large musical arcs as you enter control data across phrases rather than worrying about the velocities from one note to the next.

    With the Cube, I don't even bother with MIDI velocity any more. I sort of miss it, but then when I hear better results without it I can't really complain.




    JWL,

    Just curious - do you do this xfade with short notes as well. Of course this is the only way I work with long tones (either controlling via pedal or breath controller) - but with short notes I leave it to velocities.

    Looking forward to your reply.

    Rob