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  • Flautando

    If a string passage is marked pppp is this by definition flautando? Can you play this quietly non-flautando? How does a string player actually play flautando?

    Thanks,
    Jay

  • Flautando implies a fast bow with a lot of air in the sound. Although it is a quiet bowing, it doesn't have to be ppp. It is normally also played sul tasto, but then again sul tasto doesn't have to be flautando. I know that this is not very clear, but even string players disagree about how flautando is played [8-)]

    DG

  • Flautando implies playing slightly over the bridge so it would not automatically be played with a pppp indication. If you want that airy flute-like sound than you should indicate it.

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    @dpcon said:

    Flautando implies playing slightly over the bridge so it would not automatically be played with a pppp indication. If you want that airy flute-like sound than you should indicate it.


    No, no, no, you NEVER play flautando over the bridge; sorry.

    DG

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    @dpcon said:

    Flautando implies playing slightly over the bridge so it would not automatically be played with a pppp indication. If you want that airy flute-like sound than you should indicate it.


    No, no, no, you NEVER play flautando over the bridge; sorry.

    DG

    Sorry for the typo, not paying attention: I meant the board - the fingerboard. Yes playing over the bridge would have a decidely different sound. I use sur la touche and will do so with the LSO in about a month.

  • Whew, you had me worried for a minute. BTW I never use the word "touche"; too many opportunities for ridicule [:O]ops:

    D

  • It's the only French I ever touche - I mean touch. [H]

  • I doubt there is any pppp available unfortunatly.
    Herb promised it would be available (before the first release of the VSL) but I've never seen a very pianissimo string patch.

    Very sad
    It would be so nice, no pressure on the bow and played very slowly…

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    @Another User said:

    How does a string player actually play flautando?

    flautando = basic execution near the end of the fingerboard with flautando pressure.

    On-String-Technique: Look at flautando as a bow pressure with a vertical plane change. Where and how it is played can be added. Examples:

    flautato sul ponticello.
    Example “flautato sul pont.” See *pdf page 29
    http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses/available/etd-06262003-152118/unrestricted/02NKG.pdf

    sul tasto flautando. (sur le chevalet)
    flautato falsettato.
    flautato alla punta d'arco.
    flautato a sei. (six players only)
    flautato a mezza voce. (string section)
    con mezzo arco.
    etc.

    Flautando bow pressure: Normal bow pressure vs. flautando (vertical-plane change) as opposed to the single horizontal dimension change of the Haydn (normal bow position vs. ponticello) and normal bow position vs. ponticello (horizontal-planechange).

    Flautato can also be played behind the bridge. You can indicate flautando to be played anywhere, even on your nose (it.) “flautato sul naso e grido” or invent “flautissimevolissimevolmente”.

    Basics: Sul ponticello means on the bridge. Sul tasto means on the fingerboard, the string is bowed over the fingerboard near the end. Flautando (it.) (engl. 'flute-like'), instruction to a stringed instrument to bow over the fingerboard to produce a flute-like tone. Flautato (it) a on-string-technique in which the sound of a flute is imitated by bowing near the end of the fingerboard.

    I would indicate flautando even with Off-String-Technique. Don't shoot at me me now! [:)]

    .

  • DG's first answer said it best!

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    @dpcon said:


    No, no, no, you NEVER play flautando over the bridge; sorry.

    Why not?
    In order to make any sound at all very near the bridge one has to exert a bit of pressure, otherwise the string doesn't vibrate. Therefore by the nature of the bow stroke, flautando isn't possible near the bridge.

    DG

  • In my opinion, as both a professional violinist and conductor, while flautando does indeed imply a lightening of bow pressure, it is a color that cannot be produced on string instruments apart from bow placement over the fingerboard. Thus flautando automatically suggest sul tasto (or sur la touche, if you really wish to venture into French nomenclature with its double entendre).

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