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  • Any plans for a Harpsichord?

    Are they plans to provide a Harpsichord (or maybe different ones) in the VSL?

    Not only, that its a standard in baroque music, it's also common in 20th century music and in lots of film-scores!

    As far as i see, there's no really actual harpsichord lib. on the market, so i'm still using the -aged- harpsichords from the emu library....


    Greets:
    HTF

  • I completely agree. A VSL Harpsichord would be a most welcome addition.

  • Don't they have a harpsichord in the Post Musical Instruments website? Look under Historical Keyboards for Flemish and French items or Harpsichords Vol. 1 for French and Italian.

    http://www.postpiano.com/home.php

    Having said that I agree with the sentiments expressed above: any other plans for other early instruments (say Cornamuse, Sackbutt, Crumhorn etc.?)

  • well, nothing to do with the VSL savoir faire.
    The multisampled are too limited

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    @Laurent said:

    well, nothing to do with the VSL savoir faire.



    Well, that's the point! [[;)]]

    BTW: the E-Mu Samples are aged, but not bad; I mean the ones of the "More Emulator Standards" CD-Rom!

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    @Laurent said:

    The multisampled are too limited


    Are you looking for more dynamic levels? I don't know if you've ever played one, but harpsichords don't have an extreme dynamic range. I have the PMI Historic Instrument library, and it's quite nice. Definitely a cut above the Emu library (not that the Emu library wasn't good in its time).

    Lee Blaske

  • Harpsichords have stops. always 8', sometimes two 8' stops, one 4' and rarely 16' stops in a pedal harpsichord. Also a lute or buff stop which is a dampening of the strings for a pizz or lute effect. A stop is a set of strings.

    There is no dynamic range- just the stops and the speed of the notes.. It was the piano that became known for dynamics- remember piano et forte? Some dude named Christofori added hammers to a harpsichord and changed the course of music.

    The best sounding harpsichords are the Flemish of the 18th century IMHO. Of course that is a replica. The French are well known for the large double manual keyboards

    The best sound is the two 8' stops or voices together at a little distance in a hall. A good harpsichord has a lot of volume in this setting. It should not be miked close as you will hear too much 'pluck'. I have yet to hear the definitive sampled harpsichord.

  • this is a good general overview, but not completely accurate. in the interest of students present in the forum, i am a little more comfortable with Lee's reference to an extremely limited dynamic range rather than none at all. in function, it is not very perceptible, but it is significant to the player in terms of articulation.

    reference to the stopwork is solid with the caveat that 16' stops likely appear more frequently in the manuals given the relative obscurity of pedal instruments. 2' stops also appear rarely.

    historically, the flemish school of builders reached its zenith in the 17th century as flanders was already being annexed by the 18th, when the french builders gained prominence. not sure what the reference to replicas meant as many instruments from these periods survive, notably hans rucker's whose workmanship is regarded on par with stradivari's violins around the same time.

    while the sound of paired eights in a flemish instrument is indeed magical, it seems important to note that it would not be appropriate to all the literature, so sampling of different instruments in the french and italian styles seems as important an inclusion as an english virginal, not to mention having the availablity of a single 8' stop for continuo work if the performer wanted to thin the texture (although i didn't read your post as advocating sampling only one stop combination).

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    @Martin Bayless said:

    while the sound of paired eights in a flemish instrument is indeed magical, it seems important to note that it would not be appropriate to all the literature, so sampling of different instruments in the french and italian styles seems as important an inclusion as an english virginal, not to mention having the availablity of a single 8' stop for continuo work if the performer wanted to thin the texture (although i didn't read your post as advocating sampling only one stop combination).



    Thank you, Bruce and Martin for your helpfull overviews!
    I think your suggestions exactly show, what is to do for the VSL crew!
    I think, lot of users would like to have a fine collection of harpsichord sounds!

  • Of course, each stop has to be sampled separately. (In addition to the 2x8'). I have never seen a 2'. And yes Ruckers is the definition of quality. 17 th Century, my mistake. around 1642 ?

    Just to clarify on dynamics. When you pluck a string, there is no change in volume. But there is a huge difference in volume between an 8' Lute stop and 2x8' and 1 4' together. 3 sets of strings vs. 1.

    A library of Italian, French and Flemish instruments with a clavichord and virginal would be nice. In the meantime where do you buy a reverse ebony/ivory Midi keyboard with the proper key dip? Modern pianists/synthesists may not be aware that the earlier keyboards were much faster to play because the key dip was shorter and the touch was lighter.

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    @Laurent said:

    The multisampled are too limited


    Are you looking for more dynamic levels? I don't know if you've ever played one, but harpsichords don't have an extreme dynamic range. I have the PMI Historic Instrument library, and it's quite nice. Definitely a cut above the Emu library (not that the Emu library wasn't good in its time).

    Lee Blaske

    The repetition tool would be very usefull, a VSL harpsichord should not have a gun effect when repeating the same note.
    That may be a "multisampled" note



    [[;)]]