Vienna Symphonic Library Forum
Forum Statistics

183,883 users have contributed to 42,327 threads and 255,188 posts.

In the past 24 hours, we have 3 new thread(s), 7 new post(s) and 50 new user(s).

  • Anybody using Logic + Synchron Libraries with articulation sets?

    Hi

    I Consider moving back to Logic from Cubase. I just want to know if anyone here uses Synchron libraries + Logic AND articulation sets. And if you do, how do you manage the limitation with "only" 3 KS output?

    Best Regards


  • last edited
    last edited

    @Stig Christensen said:

    Hi

    I Consider moving back to Logic from Cubase. I just want to know if anyone here uses Synchron libraries + Logic AND articulation sets. And if you do, how do you manage the limitation with "only" 3 KS output?

    Best Regards

    I use Scripter for more than 3 keyswitches.  I have made these scripts available, including a shell script that can convert your existing Articulation Set into a working Scripter script!

    check it out here:  https://gitlab.com/dewdman42/art2script


  • Hi Dewdman42

    Thank you for your reply. I will dive into your solutions.

    Regards Stig


  • PM me if you need any help with it.


  • Helpful as always!

    Thanks!

     

    Have you ever considered Cubase/Nuendo?


  • I am using dp now

  • Stig, I've found Articulation Sets in Logic to be a mixed blessing - visibility being one of its awkward aspects, among others. Apple's choice of a maximum depth of 3 KS per Articulation operation might have something to do with the serious problem of giving easy, rapid, practical and convenient visibility to large numbers of selection possibilities - more than 8 possibilities at a time tending to give little if any workflow advantage over conventional KS-Dimension switching, as far as I've found.

    I've tried using my own MIDI Scripter scripts that can stack more than 3 KS per operation, to make Articulation Sets work conveniently with Syz Dimension Strings - the ultimate test!! - but have yet to find any real advantage in actual practice.

    After much experimentation I now use KSs conventionally for main Dimension Tree selections in Synchron Player, then use Articulation Sets only if and where I need some very fast, agile patch switching within the part of the tree already selected by conventional KSs. But in practice it's not often I need to do that.

    A word of caution on Logic's Scripter - watch your CPU performance meter! I've noticed that scripts tend to be absurdly juicy, and can too easily introduce a serious CPU burden when running on many instruments - whether the scripts are Apple's or my own. Whatever the exact process used by Logic is to compile/interpret scripts, the resulting machine code is pretty obviously far from optimal for embedded realtime control tasks in a very fast DAW like Logic.


    "The US 1st Amendment does NOT allow you to yell "FIRE!" falsely in a packed cinema, nor in an online forum." ~ Dobi (60kg Cane da pastore Maremmano-Abruzzese)
  • last edited
    last edited

    @Helmholtz said:

    A word of caution on Logic's Scripter - watch your CPU performance meter! I've noticed that scripts tend to be absurdly juicy, and can too easily introduce a serious CPU burden when running on many instruments - whether the scripts are Apple's or my own. Whatever the exact process used by Logic is to compile/interpret scripts, the resulting machine code is pretty obviously far from optimal for embedded realtime control tasks in a very fast DAW like Logic.

    I have not found that to be the case.  The amount of processing that Scripter typically does is minuscule compared to most audio plugins, Most often I can't see any extra CPU use at all happening when Scripter is used.  it is possible to write inefficient scripts....just as its possible to write inefficient plugins...and an inefficient script or plugin may use more cpu, but most typical midi scripts simply don't do that much and don't hit the CPU that hard at all.

    Scripter is absolutely a great way to handle 3+ keyswitches in LogicPro.  Apple originally only included one keyswitch per articulation, the fact that they added the ability to have two more was an afterthought and was tacked on to the GUI in an awkward way.  ..so for whatever the reason that limitation is there for now.  

    Scripter is a terrific feature in LogicPro, its one of the things I miss the most since transitioning over to DP11.  Fortunately, DP11's articulation map feature is significantly better then LogicPro in a few ways and can easily handle more than 3 keyswitches.


  • dewdman42, I stand by my word of caution on Logic's Scripter, trusting that users are able to use their own eyes and make up their own minds.

    I'm reasonably sure most Logic users are well aware of the evolutionary step of 1 KS to 3 KS in Apple's recent introduction of Articulation Sets. So I guess I'm probably not the only one to be very curious to know more about your claim that the update from 1 KS to 3 KS was an "afterthought", rather than a legitimate and duly considered update of the functional design of Articulation Sets. Do you perhaps have insider knowledge on that particular update? Please do let us know. I'm also curious about your opinion that the additional 2 KS functionality was "tacked on to the GUI in an awkward way": what is it specifically that makes it awkward for you? Do let us know. I for one have had no problems in understanding and using the new GUI.

    As for your opinions on the virtues of Logic's Scripter, I don't regard further elaborations on that topic as suitable or proper for this forum. So I'll just say this. Of course I do understand that one would want to promote one's own cottage industry in JS scripts, and be keen to identify as many apparent 'problem areas' as possible that would seem to make their scripts appear as 'absolutely great' solutions. But it's another matter altogether if that involves wilful neglect of technical realities and, even worse, groundless smearing of the perceived competition. No names, no pack drill.

    For my part, I happen to be one of the minority who are JS skeptics and who tend to take a critical and objective stance towards today's very obvious push to expand frontend website programming thinking and practice into woefully unsuitable areas of application. I'm sure many people are familiar with the image of the proverbial "man with a new hammer looking for nails to knock in", but it seems to me more a case now of a man with a stapler looking for any kind of 'fixing' job whether or not the job actually needs a man with a hammer.


    "The US 1st Amendment does NOT allow you to yell "FIRE!" falsely in a packed cinema, nor in an online forum." ~ Dobi (60kg Cane da pastore Maremmano-Abruzzese)