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  • Neptune 2017

    For a film project I needed Neptune by Holst, and since I did the original demo on this site using the First Edition,  non-VSL choir, and Altiverb (since MIR was just a gleam in Dietz's eye), I decided to do a new performance and mix of it with MIR and all VSL.  There are seven tracks of choir, all the original instruments (a huge orchestration!) and two harps including authentically programmed doubled string arpeggios on the bitonal chords Holst created.  It was really fun hearing this fabulous orchestration again, which has got to be one of the most original of all time.  I feel Holst is the equal of Debussy and Ravel in orchestration as well as some of his advanced and truly weird harmonies in this piece... 

    https://soundcloud.com/william-kersten-music/neptune-by-gustav-holst-2017


  • last edited
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    @William said:

    For a film project I needed Neptune by Holst, and since I did the original demo on this site using the First Edition,  non-VSL choir, and Altiverb (since MIR was just a gleam in Dietz's eye), I decided to do a new performance and mix of it with MIR and all VSL.  There are seven tracks of choir, all the original instruments (a huge orchestration!) and two harps including authentically programmed doubled string arpeggios on the bitonal chords Holst created.  It was really fun hearing this fabulous orchestration again, which has got to be one of the most original of all time.  I feel Holst is the equal of Debussy and Ravel in orchestration as well as some of his advanced and truly weird harmonies in this piece... 

    https://soundcloud.com/william-kersten-music/neptune-by-gustav-holst-2017

    Really very good, sensitive rendition of Jupiter.  I enjoyed listening.  The VSL choir is nice.  I've used the Requiem Pro, very different, very bold, theatrical, epic, lots of vibrato in the solo voices.  VSL is more like a choir I used to use in an EMU E6400 Ultra, calm, serene, smooth.   Good job, very musical. 


  • Nice job William. I agree about Holsts' harmonic language. Do you know his Choral Symphony, if not it's worth a listen - the harmony is quartal and has some beautiful moments.


    www.mikehewer.com
  • Thanks Jerry and Mike.  That Choral Symphony is a very interesting piece, also the Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda have a very mystical sound.    My favorite piece of all is Egdon Heath which is Holst's greatest work and a really unique composition.   I have the score for study and wanted to do a Dimension Sordino strings performance, since it is all very delicate muted strings, but haven't gotten to it, along with a lot of other stuff...


  • I think you are the only person I know of, other than me who knows the Choral Symphony. If only orchestras could do just one less performance of Beethovens' 9th or Mahler 8 and slot this work in, then a great neglected work could come home to where it belongs.

    I like Egdon Heath too, don't forget also the ravishing, enticing harmonies in the Ode to Death and The Hymn of Jesus.


    www.mikehewer.com
  • Hi William,

    This is truly amazing music. The more I hear it, the more I like it. Your approach is a wonderful interpretation and set so beautifully to samples. Not so easy (and now I know what I'm saying since my experinece with a large orchestra in Pierlala), but you did a terrific job here. And yes, this work should be programmed more by concert organisations.

    The hamonic language is interesting indeed. Not so frighteningly dissonantic, but well balanced between tradition and modernism. An art in itself!

    Thanks for sharing this 'old' work,

    Max


  • last edited
    last edited

    @William said:

    For a film project I needed Neptune by Holst, and since I did the original demo on this site using the First Edition,  non-VSL choir, and Altiverb (since MIR was just a gleam in Dietz's eye), I decided to do a new performance and mix of it with MIR and all VSL.  There are seven tracks of choir, all the original instruments (a huge orchestration!) and two harps including authentically programmed doubled string arpeggios on the bitonal chords Holst created.  It was really fun hearing this fabulous orchestration again, which has got to be one of the most original of all time.  I feel Holst is the equal of Debussy and Ravel in orchestration as well as some of his advanced and truly weird harmonies in this piece... 

    https://soundcloud.com/william-kersten-music/neptune-by-gustav-holst-2017

    Wow! This is a wonderful performance! I just listened to the original posted in MUSIC on this website, and the new mix is clearly superior to my ears. Thanks for posting this. You are truly an inspiration.


  • Thanks very much Paul and Max -  I appreciate your listening!


  • The choir in this piece reminds me a little of the choir work during the ending titles of Close Encounters of the Third Kind.  Am I the only one hearing that?

    Anyway, William very well done as always.  The piece, and your rendition of it, have a dream like quality which immerses the listener into a kind of trance.  Of course today most so-called composers can't seem to achieve this without relying on the default drones and taiko thuds.

    We need more material like Neptune.


  • Thanks Jason, the piece is very hypnotic with Holst's meditative composition and harmony.  I find it interesting how he makes all of the instruments sound very mystical, not just the "usual suspects" like eerie strings or flutes - even the trumpets sound very eerie in this piece.  He also uses the clarinet in a very expressive and mysterious way in both this piece and at the end of Egdon Heath which has an even more remote abstract quality.


  • I would of liked to compare it with the original, but doesn't matter, I'm sure it must be day and light, VSL evolved so much over the years! 

    Wonderful realization!

    It takes courage and a lot of pateience to tackle major works, but the result is quite remarquable. Overall great job with the subtle and delicat timbre and colour contrasts, as well as the mix. Nicely done with the choir at the end too. 

    Now how many planets you have left? 


  • William, fantastic rendition of this piece! It sounds authentic, with an uninterrupted flow that makes one think to an underwater realm. Now I feel full of peace, like a fish in calm waters…

    Paolo


  • Thanks very much Paolo and Guy.  

    Guy, I also did Mars but have not re-done it as it was a killer.  


  • I know that I'm joining the party late, William. :-) May I ask which MIR Venue you used for this beautiful, masterly performed piece of music?

    Thanks for sharing!


    /Dietz - Vienna Symphonic Library
  • Thanks, Dietz!  It is Viennakonzerthaus conductor's position 50% dry wet with an overall wash of some Lexicon Large Hall.


  • After a long time not having heard colleagues' samples here, I come back to find this! A benchmark example of the need to know symphonic music, and not only engineering and sequencing, in order to simulate a convincing rendition of a masterpiece.

    Hearing this again after quite a few years it's not difficult to imagine Bill's fondness for this particular planet; the textures and style that influenced Hermann later on are apparent throughout, even if the character is different.

    Congratulations for this solid recreation, and I agree with Dietz that the reverb settings were truly inspired!


  • Thanks Errikos, I appreciate it!


  • PaulP Paul moved this topic from Orchestration & Composition on