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  • MIR and other Reverb systems

     I expect to do a serious upgrade to my studio in the near future and would expect to buy MIR or MIR pro.

    I was interested in one of the reviews which did say that MIR was not a serious challenger to more established convolution sytems.

    I presume they meant Lexicon or Altiverb.  What I am interested in is whether MIR may be seen as an alternative to other systems or

    are there circumstances where both systems may be used at the same time.  I don't want to splash out on both if it is not generally necessary.

    My projects tend to be classical and jazz orientated.

    Any comments or thought would be welcome.

    Kanon


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    I can't offer an unbiased opinion, obviously 😉 .... but just to avoid misunderstandings: AFAIK, Lexicon has no convolution-based products for sale, but is known for first-class algorithmic reverb. AlitVerb is a great convolution reverb based on conventional "reverberation"-techniques.

    MIR is an innovative, highly integrated software package for mixing, spatialization (distribution in space) and reverberation of virtual orchestral instruments. Vienna MIR is meant to be used “stand-alone”, much like you would use a mixing console in the analogue world. Vienna MIR offers integrated sample-players and VSTi-hosting, advanced stage positioning possibilities, sample-based reverb, and "source conscious" signal processing. Its main goal is a fast and intuitive, yet highly realistic approach to the realisation and mixdown of virtual orchestral music. MIR stands for "Multi Impulse Response": A single venue sampled for MIR is based on several hundred (sometimes much more than thousand) individual impulse responses from a hall or soundstage - opposed to the two, four or maybe ten IRs all other convolution-based reverbs on the market rely on.

    A bit more of the basic ideas of MIR is available online, e.g. here: ->> [URL]http://www.vsl.co.at/en/211/497/1687/455/1714/1322.htm[/URL]

    If you want to go into details, both the MIR manual and a full-featured, time-limited demo-version of MIR are available for downloading from your VSL User Area.

    @kanon said:

    [...] I was interested in one of the reviews which did say that MIR was not a serious challenger to more established convolution sytems. [...]

    Was this in an online-forum review, or in a magazine? If you happen to have a link at hand, I would be very interested to read it. Thanks in advance!

    Kind regards,


    /Dietz - Vienna Symphonic Library
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    @kanon said:

    MIR was not a serious challenger to more established convolution sytems.

    I presume they meant Lexicon or Altiverb.  What I am interested in is whether MIR may be seen as an alternative to other systems or

    are there circumstances where both systems may be used at the same time.

    I don't work for VSL, and I'm fortunate enough to have reverbs from all the major food groups: Bricasti, Lexicon, TC Electronics, Altiverb, Aether, VSL convo, Space Designer, etc.

    I also have MIR. If I had purchased MIR first I wouldn't have all those other reverbs. Some perhaps, as they are useful in Pop, Rock, & Jazz. For example, don't expect a Plate reverb sound out of MIR. But if your main area of work is involved with the re-creation of acoustical spaces for ensembles then MIR is now my first 'go-to'. And yes, MIR can certainly be used in conjunction with other reverbs - either by adding it the returns from MIR or using it on completely different instruments other than those processed through MIR.

    But please don't get MIR. If the same producer is looking at both you and me for the same job and all other things are equal then I'll more than likely land it.

    .


  •  Thanks jack that was helpful

    Kanon


  •  Thanks Dietz

    The quote is from the MIR section of VSL web Quotes and Reviews page.Sound and Recording March 2009.

    Kanon


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    @kanon said:

     Thanks Dietz

    The quote is from the MIR section of VSL web Quotes and Reviews page.Sound and Recording March 2009.

    Kanon

    Ah, I see. Thanks for the link. It seems as the actual intention of the author got somewhat lost in translation from the German original. 😊 What he says is that MIR is "not just more of the same", but based on a very different approach compared to conventional reverberation engines. 

    Kind regards,


    /Dietz - Vienna Symphonic Library