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  • reverb - pre or post fader? Christian K's demo approach?

    Hi,

    I'm struggling trying to achieve good results with reverb and VSL - I'm using Space Designer in Logic 7.

    I'm currently trying the method Christian Kardeis uses in the mixing demo of using pre-fader reverb sends. I understand that you are controlling the wet/dry signal with the fader (i.e controlling how far away from you the instrument is?) but I'm having difficulty using this to control volume levels. I'm using his Logic file as a template, and he has most of the bus sends at -3 to -6 level, but some of the woodwind bus sends are up to -15. Can anyone explain to me what the different levels of bus send do - I would have thought that the sends should all be the same level as you are controlling the reverb signal with the fader?

    I've seen reference to different methods of applying reverb, including Beat Kaufmann's method of using three different reverbs for different depths. Does anyone have an opinion about which is the best/easiest way to work - pre or post fader?

    I'd really appreciate any help with this.

    Many thanks

    Jamie


  • Hi Jamie,

    This is the way I see it, though I'm no mixing expert.

    PRE BUS SENDS ADVANTAGES:

    1) You can easily adjust the wet/dry mix of each track by adjusting the track fader.

    2) You don't have to use an extra bus for dry signals.

    PRE BUS SENDS DISADVANTAGES:

    1) To adjust the volume of each track you have to move both the bus fader and the track fader simultaneously in the same relationship relative to each other.

    POST BUS SENDS ADVANTAGES:

    1) You can easily adjust the volume of each track by adjusting the track fader.

    2) You have more control over where you send the dry signal.

    3) You can adjust the wet/dry mix of each track by adjusting your post-send dry volume.

    4) You can adjust the wet/dry mix of entire sections easily by adjusting the fader on your dry bus.

    POST BUS SENDS DISADVANTAGES:

    1) You have to use an extra bus for the dry signals.

    Hope this helps!

    Brian


  • Thanks a lot for that reply Brian, really helpful.

    I may be being a bit stupid (sorry, I'm a composer and not an engineer!) but what do you mean by an extra bus for the dry signals? I can't see why there is more to it than setting up a reverb for the orchestra, and giving the instruments at the back of the orchestra a higher send level than the ones at the front. And I don't understand either why some people mention using 3 different reverbs for different depths - surely it's all the same hall?


  • last edited
    last edited

    Hi Jamie,

    @Another User said:

    And I don't understand either why some people mention using 3 different reverbs for different depths - surely it's all the same hall?

    You have to use different reverb depths to get a more realistic sonic picture of the hall, though the required number of reverbs is debatable.  I generally use two, though many use three, and I've even heard of people using five or more.  You really have to experiment with this on your own, but to my ears I can never get the brass to sound right if they are sitting in the same mic distance as the woodwinds and strings no matter how more wet they are than the woodwinds and strings.  I always have to place them one mic position further back.  Also keep in mind that each hall will react differently, you just have to experiment, trust your ears, and compare your results with live recordings to get better.

    Brian