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  • Beethoven's 9th

    Well, this is not a 'Mock-Up' of Beethoven's 9th Symphony. I dont think its possible with current sampling technology anyway. May be Jay Bacal can do it.

    Anyway - I just wanted to say that Beethoven's 9th is possibly a miracle. I have listened to it so many times and each time I listen to it - I feel as if it is something that is i just no possible to ever do again or its not from our world.

    In classical music - there are certain composers that just suck up everything inside you. I cant listen to much after listening to Beethoven's 9th and also Mozart's Requiem. I find that both these pieces just leave one thoughtless.  Its just so good - I cant listen to anything after that. I dont know why that is.

    With all the complexity that 20th/21st century music has to offer and of course also the so called 'post-modern' music is also included in this - there is something hdiden in older music that is missing from today's music.

    I think perhaps, Ravel, Debussy, Prokofiev have also captured my imagination amongst MANY others.

    Actually - I dont know - I am full of emotions for orchestral music right now. And just want to say that how thankful I am - that it exists. I cannot imagine a life without orchestral music. It is for me the greatest miracle of all times.

    These guys were thinking of panning, localization of sound, EQ and compression way before these concepts were included in Modern day technology. Orchestration is in itself the best EQ, Compressor, Limiter, Vintage Warmer and Reverb in itself.

    And I want to thank all these Great composers for passing this on and also all of you at VSL and the VSL Forum members for allowing me to learn so much and giving all of us more than we deserve.

    I cannot imagine  a life without Orchestral music and VSL.

    Sorry for the slightly mushy message. Why dont all of you send in your inner most feelings. No Technical stuff - just pure feeling.

    Its like Wagner's - On Drama - Compendium of his Prose works. Rely on your feeling - rather than technical understanding of music.

    We seem to forget ( I do sometimes) - the feeling element of music. I wish composers were just allowed to do whatever they wanted!

    Spoil yourselves - Send in your inner feelings..............................................................................

    And Thank You: Beethoven, Bach, Mozart, Debussy, Ravel, Schumann, Wagner, Schubert, Sergey Prokofiev, Gustav Mahler, Richard Strauss, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Gustav Holst, Rimsky-Korsakov, Vaughn Williams, Dmitri Shostakovich, Verdi, Erik Satie, Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber, Arvo Part.

    Bernard Herrmann, John Williams, Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Danny Elfman, Miklos Rozsa, Ennio Morricone.....

    Best,

    Tanuj.


  • LvB's 9th is indeed a work of staggering genius. All the elements that make up music are presented at their highest level. So perfectly amalgamated that it strikes one as the pinnacle of writing for the Symphony in the Classic style. It is so much more than that. It is a summing up of all music before it and all music that was to follow. Music exalted into the spiritual dimension while remaining thoroughly scientific and utterly human all at the same time. It may be the greatest work of art in history and easily a prime contender for that title.


  •  that's true, especially about being "scientific" but also human in that Beethoven's technique was beyond any other composer of the time (and maybe still today) and yet he used it for a spiritual purpose.  There is a Zen -like mastery in this Western masterpiece as much as any work of the East.  Maybe that is why it is so popular in Japan as well?  It seems that the greatest artists transcend any locality.


  •  I just happened to be reading about the 9th and the author was noting how Beethoven, in contrast to both Mozart and Schubert, had to struggle for every inch of ground with his composing, with whole notebooks filled with scratched out pages, torn up scores, blotted out and replaced notes.  Quite a difference from the supposed facility of Mozart and Schubert.  Whle that is probably exaggerated, it is certain they did less revision than Beethoven.


  • While it is balanced with an obvious desire for public appeal and success, the type of profound universal truth-seeking that he obsessed over in his last string quartets and piano works (no doubt ampflified by the isolation and inwardness caused by deafness), had an equally profound effect on the more outward and public pieces like the 9th.  Like many have said before, it simply has it all...and like with all of his works, it goes straight for the jugular and doesn't let go till the end, whether he's destroying you with the violent military rhythms of the first movement, mocking everything with an almost pre-mahler totentanz of the second, pouring out and pleading with his most naive and childlike innocent feelings in the third, or...well, from the fourth movement on...all bets are off: Opera, oratorio, sonata, variations, hymn, hints of "world music" (the Janissary section), you name it...it's seemlessly woven into the fabric.

    I'm never more inspired AND humbled than when I teach this piece in my theory/composition classes.  Where to begin?!?  There is a quote by bernstein where he talks about sitting down to "review" the piece for upcoming performances, thinking that since he had done it many times before, he would just quickly review it and the get on with it.  Well, after a significant stretch of studying the score he was on bar 30 or something like that!!  It seems that no matter what, this piece brings everyone to their knees....in the best sense of the phrase...in awe and reverence.

    O


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    @William said:

     I just happened to be reading about the 9th and the author was noting how Beethoven, in contrast to both Mozart and Schubert, had to struggle for every inch of ground with his composing, with whole notebooks filled with scratched out pages, torn up scores, blotted out and replaced notes.  Quite a difference from the supposed facility of Mozart and Schubert.  Whle that is probably exaggerated, it is certain they did less revision than Beethoven.

    Yes the sketchbooks clearly show his continuous reworking of his material until it was perfect. I think this quality of fighting and overcoming any obstacle that stood between him and his vision is what is so attractive about Beethoven. He certainly did that with his deafness and conquered it in an astonishing show of his indomitable spirit. I think God conquered him in a way with that terrible affliction resulting in his latest works which touch the depths of those who have suffered greatly. He didn't just plumb the depths with his works, he lived there.


  • PaulP Paul moved this topic from Orchestration & Composition on